Finished House

Before you get too excited by this blogs title, I had better clarify, it’s Chumlee’s house that is finished, not ours.

It’s getting cold in the mountains now and with a bitter wind the last 2 nights our 16 week old puppy has been a little chilly. His bed is on the back verandah, which is sheltered from the rain, but the wind rips right through the valley our verandah faces.

This sudden change of weather has forced a snap decision to build a dog house. I would have loved to design and build one of my own original ideas, but to save time and bother I bought a kit that isn’t far off what I wanted;
Aaron’s Outdoors Large Dog House

I know this is cheating, I don’t feel good about it either, but hopefully this quick project gives ideas to those wanting to build a doggy chateau.

Yellow tongue flooring (ironically) is used for the floor. Depending on the size you need, this may need to be joined with blocks as sheets are only 900mm wide

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Try to find a helper that won’t slobber on everything

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These prefabricated walls make it easy, but to build them yourself shouldn’t be too difficult. The frame is 4×2 timber ripped down to 2×2.
The cladding is rough sawn treated pine, which is cheap, but you could use any other type of cladding depending on how fancy you want to be.
The door surround is hardwood, Jarrah to be exact, so it won’t rot or wear easily.

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Screw the walls together with 75mm galvanised screws. These are hex heads, but any would do, as long as they are galvanised or stainless steel.

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After all the walls are screwed together, fasten them into the base, going right through the flooring into the blocks

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At this point you could put a flat roof on top, but I think a pitched roof looks better.

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So add some gables to the front and back to form the pitch. No need for structural style trusses here, the gable walls are enough. Note the timber blocks added to hold the roof in place.

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Next comes the roof sections, with batons for screwing the roof sheet down and treated pine ends.

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They have really gone all out with fancy timber work here. This piece holds the two roof sections together.

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Colourbond roof sheets are fitted next, keeping them about an inch away from the sides for the water to drain. I used an off cut of flooring to space it as you can see.

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Finally screw the roof capping on and you’re done!

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Chumlee doesn’t like it yet, and even though we threw all his blankets and toys inside he won’t have a bar of it.

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Maybe when it drops below 10 degrees he will appreciate it more?!

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4 thoughts on “Finished House

  1. I admit, my first reaction on seeing this title was “already!?! how can he be done already? no wonder he didn’t post last month.” My second reaction once I read the rest of the post is “I need a Chumlee!” He’s awesome. And looks like a very good helper. What’s his story? Where’d you get him? What kind is he? How big will he grow? How’s puppy training going?

    • Hi Julia, yes it was too good to be true!
      You should get a Chumlee too! I promised my wife she could get a dog as soon as we got a decent sized yard. We have it now, so no more excuses… And I’m loving him.
      He is a Douge de Bordeaux, which is a French mastiff. 16 weeks and already 17kg. He is going to be a big boy, about 60kg if he stays lean. His dad was a very big boy.
      Puppy training just started and he is doing well. I am more concerned about when he gets older, and all slobbery. Have you seen Turner and Hooch? He is a Hooch dog!

      • If you love mastiffs like we do, but don’t want the slobber, look for Cane Corso’s which is the Italian mastiff. They are not too big, have a great temperament and look awesome in blue colour. We wanted one, but the breeders in Australia are few and far in between.
        The only thing I don’t like; in your region the breeders dock their ears and tails, which I don’t agree with, and I prefer their look with big floppy ears and a wagging tail.

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